Body Metrics and Concealed Carry

Most people choose their first handgun to be accurate, reliable, comfortable to hold and easy to shoot. In all cases the “revolver” is most reliable because of its simplistic action (moving parts) design. The greatest holding comfort is attained with one finger on the trigger and a full three finger hand grip. It’s more exciting for most people to shoot a larger caliber weapon, but, the most accurate shooting gun for a beginner is generally a 22 caliber.

First time gun owners will often fall in love with a handgun that offers best grip and shooting accuracy at the firing range without attention to the importance of concealment and comfort features until they start carrying. Decisions to Concealed Carry with the above weapon selection will work for some individuals, but, usually results in seldom use and/or a gun in the glove compartment.

Physical preparation for serious full-time Concealed Carry must first consider “body metrics” as a starting point for choosing handgun and holster. Body metrics is actually the science of using three-dimensional, computer generated measurements of the entire body to determine best clothing fit, or, design of a health training program.

Gathering dimensional data by this method is not necessary for Concealed Carry, but a basic understanding of one’s unique personal shape will help choose best body location for a holster offering maximum comfort and concealment. A wide range of holster concepts are available with each type worn in different positions; on one’s ankle, inside the belt, outside the belt, above the waist, behind the back, or, over the shoulder. These locations will determined where a holster is best suited to allow sitting, standing, walking and bending over, without printing, as you go through your daily routine.

Full-time concealment requires preparation for all seasons with the warm season being most difficult to resolve due to wearing less clothing. The smaller guns are obviously best for comfort and concealment while big guns are more cumbersome and difficult to hide. Gun-size effectiveness becomes a matter of personal choice, as the debate continues between “experts” with conflicting opinions.

The revolver has a reputation for reliability, but, today’s semi-automatics are very good after a break in period which may require several hundred firings. The semi-auto has a narrow width compared to a revolver cylinder, thus making it much more practical to hide for Concealed Carry. In past years, typical concealment mainly involved an outer cover garment; however, dress fashion has become one of the top priorities in today’s style conscious society having a deep effect on the frequency of individual Concealed Carry.

Today’s Concealed Carry “look” is simply to “look” like you are not carrying. Body metrics have a major effect on correct holster selection; therefore, considerations should be mainly based on a person’s physique. Manufactures noticed the demand for new Concealed Carry products by offering special shirts with internal pockets for handguns, fake buttons to allow quick access and special trousers with extra-large pockets for weapons. Special clothing is expensive and requires a change in dress style, but, it may work for some people.

Full-time Concealed Carry is driven by strong motivation and supplemented by proper choice handgun and holster, to not leave your gun at home, or, in the glove compartment. The reasons for carrying a firearm will never change and your “Concealed Carry Look” will be same as your “normal look” if you make the right choices…Keep on packin dude.

Purchase the Stealth Defense Holster; for details see our website.

See Video: Concealment Holsters – The World’s Best Concealment Holster

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