Concealed Carry Past & Present

One of the great wonders of this magnificent country we live in is Yellowstone National Park, visited by over 3 million people annually; however, many gun advocates are not familiar with the near-by small town of Cody Wyoming.

This area consist of beautiful mountains and thousands of acres of open grassland with hundreds of Mustang horses and people that fit well within the stereotype image of the hard working, tanned leather skin American Cowboy. They behold a sound attitude toward religious freedom and appreciation for the USA with lots of “True Grit”. (as noted in the old John Wayne movie)

Spend some time there to see a Rodeo, enjoy delightful western style barbecue at Bubba’s and visit the “Buffalo Bill Center Of The West” museum to witness an unbelievable display of firearms plus learn interesting tales about ole Billy’s adventures in the wild west.

The Cody museum has the most complete gun collection in the world consisting of 7,000 firearms ranging from, well-known manufactures to those long forgotten, from the 1700’s flintlocks up to present day high production types. Concealed Carry owners will be most interested in the collection of handguns used for self-protection.

In earlier days, they were more commonly referred to as “pocket guns” or “vest guns” carried by wealthy men and women for protection against “highwaymen”. Concealed Carrying a flintlock was a burden and gun-makers made little progress to improve concealment and reduce snagging on clothing until the “rim fire” and “center fire” cartridges arrived.

Did you know that the Henry Deringer’s design was so popular that other manufacturers began producing “Derringers”? They changed the spelling of Henry’s last name by adding an additional “r” to avoid any legal infringements.

Other early ingenious design Concealed Carry guns were featured like the “Pepper Box” with a 6-round revolving barrel which is a forerunner of the modern revolver. The manual expertise demonstrated in each of these artifacts is of the highest quality. It’s incredible what our early craftsman accomplished with a forging hammer, file, hand-made gun-drill bits, engraving tools and crude machinery.

These relics of technology present an amusing comparison with Concealed Carry weapon design progress over the last 100 plus years, but, in no way would you want to carry one for self-protection.

Todays Concealed Carry handguns have evolved beyond comparison. They are lighter, stronger, safer, more reliable, more accurate, more comfortable to carry, more affordable, easier to shoot, higher magazine capacity and easier to conceal. Cartridges have also evolved dramatically as they superseded the flintlock offering greater explosive power, simplicity and speed loading capabilities. A plethora of handgun sizes and shapes is available from today’s prominent manufacturers.

This wide choice range can be intimidating for the inexperienced Concealed Carry person and, the first handgun and holster purchase may not be the best choice at meeting your Concealed Carry needs for comfort, concealment and clothing requirements. This can become an unsolved dilemma until after weeks, or, months of carrying practice.

What will future guns of the next 100 years look like? Will there be “smart bullets” that hunt for their target? Will your handgun have an owner “signature code”, for security and safety, thus preventing others from firing you weapon? Will it have an integrated GPS-911 “distress call” feature that activates during a life-threatening encounter…or…will the handgun be totally replaced by another invention…or… will we even need to Concealed Carry?

Who knows what these “think-tankers” are “smoking” and going to come up with next, but, in the meantime; hang in there with “true grit”, be safe and…keep on packin dude.

Purchase the Stealth Defense Holster; for details see our website.

See Video: Concealment Holsters – The World’s Best Concealment Holster

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