Concealed Carry Practice Techniques

Prices continue to rise along with cost of living expenses while wages and salaries are stagnated. Today’s dollar is worth about 78 cents compared to10 years ago and the 17 trillion dollar debt, created by our politicians, is costing taxpayers (you and I) over 40% interest. (Would you pay this interest for a personal debt?) Hopefully you wisely invested that first dollar saved for retirement in 1970 because it’s now worth only 17 cents.

In order to survive financially, we need to look for cost cutting measures in our personal lives (and also become more engaged with our politicians). “Dry shooting” practice, also called “Dry Firing”, can maintain our shooting skills and help reduce ammunition costs. Dry shooting with an empty handgun can be done anywhere, anytime, while being completely safe without creating a noise disturbance.

Dry practice scenarios can include drawing your weapon, aiming, trigger activation, magazine load & reloading. All can be done with no need for ammunition, shooting fees and transportation costs to and from the range. Perhaps the most important part of Concealed Carry practice is mental conditioning which can also be improved by a technique called “Creative Visualization”. It’s a mental development process originally publicized in the early 1900’s as a practice method for improving the outcome of any action you may take, such as learning to become an awesome shooter.

Visualizing mental shooting and situation tactics will improve Concealed Carry skills by repeatedly visualizing successful actions, over and again, with intensive use of your five senses; vision, smell, hearing, taste, touch and feel to absorb each self-defense action. This mental repetition develops “muscle memory” which triggers automatic reaction during an actual Concealed Carry encounter. Animals are well known for their instinctive use of sensory perceptions on which their survival depends. (Some animals can actually detect electrical or magnetic fields for navigation in addition to the ordinary senses humans have).

This Creative Visualization technique, used by Olympic athletes for many years, will improve your understanding of the basic fundamentals of shooting; positioning yourself in front of the target, the two hand grip and breathing control while sighting and squeezing the trigger. Practice should also include envisioning safety measures handling a loaded gun, scanning the target area before shooting and when to place your finger on the trigger.

Live shooting practice may reveal a specific weakness like; shooting low and left which requires an improvement in trigger squeeze. Repeating Creative Visualizations while including each of your senses; slowly squeezing the trigger with a tight two-hand grip while at the same time envisioning perfect front-rear sight on target will force mental development of these skills. The bottom line is to use all five of your senses repeatedly for efficient learning. If you can see, smell, feel, hear and somehow taste each fundamental, your skills will improve.

Program your Concealed Carry mind for any event including and attack from and assailant while you are in your car, at home, walking in a risky area etc. This does not mean that we should stop going to the range, we just won’t go as often. There is nothing more exciting than actually shooting live ammo, but, dry shooting can make you an awesome sheepdog with an iron mind and a healthier wallet…dry practice dude…it’s safe, economical, and, effective.

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See Video: Concealment Holsters – The World’s Best Concealment Holster

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